The first American furniture, silver, flags and more excellent at Freeman’s

PHILADELPHIA – Freeman’s November 10 American Furniture, Folk and Decorative Art Auction featured competitive auctions on U.S. national flags, rare silver, early American furniture, and paintings from the XIXth century. The sale reached an impressive $ 1.64 million with an 80% sell rate and a total of 330 registered bidders.

“The auction was a collection of rare and historic Americana that attracted a wide range of collectors and dealers,” said Lynda Cain, sales manager. “From extraordinary folk art and American flags to a fine selection of 18th century silverware by renowned makers, to historic landscapes, portraits and furniture of Philadelphia, fine representative examples have garnered considerable attention and won awards. students. We are delighted with the results.

Key to Freeman’s success in auctioning and beyond is a market return to regionalism; As the company witnesses a growing appreciation for items made in the United States, uniquely American items maintain and increase their strength in the marketplace. Positioned in the Cradle of America, Freeman’s consistently delivers strong results for important American items. “It was a good sale,” Cain said. “We received a lot of things from families that had never surfaced before. We had an institutional interest and we had very active calls for tenders. We had a lot of things returned to the family, including William and Mary Hadley’s chest. “

The auction featured a large group of American silverware through the ages, from items from the Pilgrim era to classic display pieces and late 19th century tea and cutlery sets. “It was the finest collection of antique American silverware that we’ve had in a long time,” Cain said. Philadelphia-made silver coins generated a lot of interest among buyers, including a silver coffee maker made by William Hollingshead (1728-1808), circa 1770, which fetched $ 37,800 from an estimate of $ 20 / 30,000 , and a silver-covered mug by Philip Syng Jr, circa 1750, which sold for $ 30,240, almost double expectations. The Hollingshead silver coffee pot was baluster in shape on a pedestal base with gadrooning, domed lid with gadrooned rim and urn shaped finial and spout protruding from a rockery seal. It had a wooden handle with scrolls, its body engraved with a Rococo cartouche containing the monogram “LP”, marked three times under the reverse.

A silver caudle cup and a silver-covered mug both fetched $ 27,720.

Dillsburg, Penn., Americana Specialist Jeff Bridgman saw the sole proprietorship offer of Jeffrey Kenneth Kohn, MD’s US National Flag Collection as a great opportunity to shop for the stock. Kohn, a leading expert and dealer in the American national flag, had been accumulating his collection for over 35 years, sometimes mixing the flags with Bridgman’s inventory. So, knowing the collection well, Bridgman bought a dozen prime copies from the forty on offer, recounting Antiques and Arts Weekly that they “were the best flags in the sale. A few others who were high profile have passed due to high reserves. There were a couple of other exceptional non-category flags that performed well. I was delighted with what I bought, ”he said.

In particular, said Bridgman, a rare 13-star American national flag with 21 “scattered stars”, circa 1824, and later updated, was remarkable because it was the former Dr Whitney Smith (1940- 2016). “He was the one who coined the term ‘vexillology’ – the study of flags,” said the merchant. “He had a huge collection. It was the best of his early Stars & Stripes and served as the keystone of what he owned in this very important category. It was not the most expensive at this auction – having been narrowly surpassed by the 44 “US” stars, but it was the best flag in the sale. The flag, with 13 hand-sewn single appliqué cotton stars arranged in an oval on the first wool bunting townships, with the subsequent addition of 21 small hand-sewn cotton stars, 13 wool bunting bands Hand-sewn, linen header with two whip-sewn eyelets and “CC Hodgkins” script finished at $ 59,850.

Rare examples amassed by Kohn, a prominent national flag expert, included the 44-star flag commemorating the state of Wyoming, which more than doubled its high estimate to $ 63,000.

Civil War era flags performed well, including a 34-star “Union and Liberty Forever” flag commemorating the state of Kansas, which far exceeded its estimate to reach $ 35,280; overall, the results confirmed Freeman’s place in showcasing unique and targeted collections at auction.

Adopted at auction, a 43-star American ceremonial flag commemorating the state of Idaho, circa 1890, was a private post-auction sale, according to Cain, priced at $ 25,200. It featured 43 stars painted in polychromy arranged in a double medallion on a corn-blue fine wool canton, with machine-sewn fine wool stripes. “More comes from this collection,” Cain said.

Several results in the categories of American furniture, folk arts, and decorative arts confirmed the strength of the market for stellar examples of early American furniture making. Two 18th and 19th century pieces in Philadelphia broke estimates: a Chippendale carved mahogany side chair, which exceeded its high estimate of $ 5,000 by almost 13 times to reach $ 63,000, and a pillar table inlaid and figured mahogany, which has doubled its high estimate to sell for $ 50,400. Sourced from an estate in New Jersey, the Chippendale chair was a tour de force of sculpture with a carved and drilled splat, a curved crest with ears ending in scrolls and centered with a prominent shell, a front seat rail with a carved shell, cabriole feet with carved acanthus knees, returns with volutes, ball and claw feet and slip seat with needlepoint upholstery. What is behind its exceptional performance? Cain speculated that the sale may have been made to create a pair.

Two New England works triggered a tender, both a William and Mary carved oak chest of drawers, which fetched $ 20,160, and the Kellogg / Belden Family Queen Anne Carved Cherry Tall Dresser, which sold for $ 18,900. As mentioned earlier, the Hadley chest returned to the family. Attributed to Ichabod Allis (1675-1747), according to the story associated with the coin, the chest was made for Lydia Allis (1702-1737), daughter of Ichabod and Mary Belding Allis (1679-1724) of Hatfield, Mass. “It was purchased by the eighth or ninth generation descendants of Ichabod Allis through Lydia’s sister,” Cain said. “So it’s back in the family.”

Leading the sale was a historic Philadelphia landscape, “View of Fairmount Water-Works with Schuylkill in Distance,” circa 1840, which fetched $ 69,300. “It was just wonderful,” Cain said. “It was full of details, and we usually see Fairmont on the other side, so it’s an interesting prospect. At the last minute someone came to see it and just had to get it, so it also went to a private bidder.

Thomas Sully’s “Portrait of a Girl Holding a Pet Terrier” exceeded its high estimate by nearly 12 times to reach $ 59,850. The framed oil on canvas was initialed with the number “TS” at the bottom left and retained the old label on the back. He’s heading south. Cain said, “There have been vigorous auctions, at least three phone lines and the internet vigorous. It was a very attractive painting, and the dog and child were wonderful. She had a very contemporary face.

Measuring 26Ã ?? ½ by 21 inches, he had been taped in The life and works of Thomas Sully (1783-1872) (Biddle, Edward and Fielding, Mantle) and belonged to the collection of Mrs. Theodore Linke and JC NcNerney.

Historic American works have generated a great deal of interest among buyers, from the 1833 Eagle Map of the United States Engraved for Basics of National Knowledge which fetched $ 44,100 and goes to an institution to a handkerchief printed on copper, “First Built Line of Battle Ship in the Western World,” circa 1814, which exceeded its estimate by almost 14 times to sell for $ 40,950.

The prices quoted include the buyer’s premium as stated by the auction house. The next Americana sale is scheduled for April 27 at 2400 Market Street. For more information, www.freemansauction.com or 215-563-9275.

The Kellogg / Belden family Queen Anne carved cherry tall chest has sold for $ 18,900.

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A New England piece, this William and Mary carved oak Hadley dresser with drawer was sold for $ 20,160.

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Dillsburg, Penn., Americana scholar Jeff Bridgman purchased a dozen American national flags from the collection of Jeffrey Kenneth Kohn, MD, including this rare 13-star copy with 21 “scattered stars”, circa 1824, which ended at $ 59,850.

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A silver caudle cup reached $ 27,720.

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This silver-covered mug also cost $ 27,720.

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A silver-covered tankard by Philip Syng Jr., circa 1750, sold for $ 30,240, almost double expectations.

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Among the grouping of American money, this coffee maker made by William Hollingshead (1728-1808), around 1770, reached $ 37,800 against an estimate of $ 20/30,000.

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An inlaid and figured mahogany pillar table doubled its high estimate to sell for $ 50,400.

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Shattering estimates were this Chippendale carved mahogany side chair, which topped its high estimate of $ 5,000 by almost 13 times to reach $ 63,000.

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A handkerchief printed on a copper plate, “First Built Line of Battle Ship in the Western World,” circa 1814, exceeded its estimate by almost 14 times to sell for $ 40,950.

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Topping the sale was a historic Philadelphia landscape, “View of Fairmount Water-Works with Schuylkill in Distance,” circa 1840, which fetched $ 69,300.

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Thomas Sully’s “Portrait of a Girl Holding a Pet Terrier” exceeded its high estimate by nearly 12 times to reach $ 59,850.

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Civil War era flags performed well, including a 34-star “Union and Liberty Forever” flag commemorating the state of Kansas, which far exceeded its estimate to reach $ 35,280.

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Historical American works have generated a lot of interest among buyers, including this engraved 1833 Eagle Map of the United States for Basics of National Knowledge that was offered for $ 44,100.

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Among the few examples Kohn collected was this 44-star flag commemorating the state of Wyoming, which more than doubled its high estimate to $ 63,000.

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