From a Sami knife to a bowl of pyrography, the value of these collectibles lies in their stories

It is always a pleasure to see and seek out the treasures of our readers. Many denounce today’s consumer culture, which emphasizes disposable materialism, but these pieces have long been loved and preserved. While our items this month have a wide range of dollar values, their true value to many collectors will be in their history.

Scrimshaw knife

This knife is a Puukko, a traditional knife used by the Sami people of Lapland.Courtesy of the collector

Q. I bought this knife several years ago from an antique store and discovered it in my attic last week. Can you tell me something? It is signed and appears to be old. It is 8 1/2 inches long, 1 inch wide and 3/4 inch deep.

TK, Durham

A. Your knife is a Puukko, a traditional knife used by the Sami people of Lapland. It probably dates from the middle of the 20th century. It is handmade, with the steel blade set in a bone handle with leather washers for gripping, and has a bone scabbard with a leather frog. The work of scrimshaw is very pleasant. The incised name, G. Keini, is likely the owner of the knife, rather than the maker. At auction, you might see a sale of $ 300 to $ 500. A dealer specializing in knives could ask for anywhere from $ 600 to $ 1,000, or even more if further research could attribute it to a specific manufacturer.

Autumn dancer sculpture

This dancing figure seems to be in cold painted bronze and imitation ivory, on an onyx and marble plinth.

This sculpture is titled Autumn Dancer and is a copy of the original, designed by Ferdinand Preiss circa 1925.Courtesy of the collector

Q. I bought this figure from a rug import shop in Portland over 30 years ago. He just “spoke” to me. I know very little about the provenance of this piece other than that the seller claimed it came from a real estate sale in Europe. He was tagged as “Isadora Duncan Autumn Dancer”. There is no maker’s mark anywhere. The base is 5 inches high and 6 inches wide. The figure measures 11 inches. He weighs about 10 pounds.

PP, Hillsboro

A. Your sculpture is titled Autumn Dancer and is a copy of the original, designed by Ferdinand Preiss (German, 1892-1943) circa 1925. Preiss is widely regarded as one of the most important sculptors of the Art Deco period. . Your figurine appears to be cold painted bronze and imitation ivory, on an onyx and marble plinth – a prime example of Art Deco style. At auction, you might see a sale of $ 250 to $ 350. A dealer specializing in Art Deco design could charge anywhere from $ 600 to $ 900. Original cold-painted bronze and ivory sculptures signed by Preiss have been auctioned for prices in excess of $ 80,000.

Cabinet of curiosities

A wooden cabinet with glass doors rests against a wall.

This mahogany cabinet of curiosities is in the Art Nouveau style.Courtesy of the collector

This cabinet of curiosities has been in the family for at least six generations. It has no manufacturer or original marking. It measures 56 inches high from the ground to the flat top and is 45 inches wide and 15 inches deep at most. I hope you can enlighten us on its origin and what it can be worth.

NR, Aloha

A. Your mahogany cabinet of curiosities is in the Art Nouveau style and dates from around 1890-1910. At auction, it can cost anywhere from $ 200 to $ 300, and a period furniture dealer may charge $ 600 to $ 900 for such a piece, if it is in excellent condition and in good condition.

Pyography Bowl

This wooden bowl has images of squirrels on the inside at the bottom, oak leaves on the outside, and dogs around the inner rim.

This bowl is a fine example of pyrography, sometimes referred to as pokerwork.Courtesy of the collector

Q. This wooden bowl is originally from Northeast Oklahoma. It measures 11 inches across at the top, has images of squirrels on the inside at the bottom, oak leaves on the outside, and dogs around the inside edge. 1906 is carved on the underside.

SE, Woodburn

A. Your bowl is a fine example of pyrography, sometimes referred to as pokerwork, which involves decorating pieces of wood with a hot poker or woodworking tool. Pokerwork was very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Your bowl may be an entirely original piece, or it may have been made from a kit, which provided a smooth wooden item printed with an ink drawing as a guide for burning. One of the main suppliers of these kits was the Flemish Art Company of New York. At auction, your bowl can fetch a selling price of $ 20 to $ 40. A dealer specializing in American folk art could charge $ 70 to $ 100.

Calling card tray

A green bowl is placed on a wooden table.

This pressed glass piece was manufactured by the Jefferson Glass Company.Courtesy of the collector

Q. Can you tell us about the history of making and the value of this green bowl? A relative told us he was over 100 years old. It measures approximately 8 1/2 inches in diameter on top and measures approximately 3 1/4 inches in height.

MF, Hayden Island

A. Your pressed glass piece was made by the Jefferson Glass Company which operated in Steubenville, Ohio, and Follansbee, West Virginia, from 1900 to 1930. It is in the Jefferson Wheel and Wheel and Gate pattern, probably dating from 1908-1909 and was originally intended for use as a business card tray. At auction, similar examples sold for between $ 15 and $ 20. A dealer can charge $ 40 to $ 50 if it is in excellent condition and in good condition.

About today’s collectables

The values ​​discussed for the items shown in this column were researched by the Portland Rater Jerry I. Dobesh, ASA, an accredited senior appraiser with the American Society of Appraisers, with a specialty designation in Antiques and Decorative Arts. Its services include providing assessments for inheritance rights, charitable contributions, insurance planning and loss, and fair distribution needs.

To find an assessor, contact the American Society of Appraisers, the International Society of Appraisers, or the Association of Assessors of America. The estimates suggested in this Collectibles column are for general information purposes only and cannot be used as a basis for sales, insurance or IRS purposes.

In order for elements to be considered for inclusion in future columns, please send us your high quality images, preferably at least 300 dpi, 1MB in size and in jpeg format. Photos should show each object in its entirety and should be clearly focused and well lit to show detail. If there are any maker’s marks, please include a picture of them. Include measurements and information about the condition of the part.

Send to: [email protected]

or at: Today’s Collectibles / Homes & Gardens The Oregonian 1500 SW First Ave., Suite 400

Portland, OR 97201

Please include your name and city, as well as your contact details; phone number or email address. Contact details will not be published. The Oregonian will retain the rights to use the photographs for its print, marketing and online media.


Source link

About Frances White

Check Also

Brisbane’s art deco units spark unprecedented demand within minutes of listing

Six chic art-deco apartments in Brisbane’s Golden Triangle sold for record-breaking sums after a sea …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *